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National security impacts for U.S. Space Command

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Posted at 5:45 PM, Feb 15, 2021
and last updated 2021-02-23 13:33:05-05

COLORADO SPRINGS — The announcement made in the final days of the Trump administration to move U.S. Space Command from Colorado to Alabama has led to Colorado elected officials calling for investigations and changes.

Among the arguments to move the headquarters is national security, which can include a wide range of issues.

Something Retired General Ralph "Ed" Eberhart knows all too well, he served as the final commander of U.S. Space Command before it dissolved in 2002. Space Command returned in August of 2019 along with U.S. Space Force.

"At that time it was different obviously than it is now," Eberhart said, "we can no longer assume that a war won't begin in or be prosecuted to some degree in space."

As Space becomes more of a point of conversation in Washington and beyond, the announcement of moving the headquarters is something Eberhart says should be looked over again.

"When you talk about national security you don't just talk about military operations, it's much broader than that," Eberhart said.

One aspect of national security when it comes to Space Command- the economy, Eberhart says a move would play a role in that. He believes it's in the best interest to keep U.S. Space Command in Colorado.

Colorado Springs has a long history of being home to U.S. Space Command, one aspect Eberhart says should play a part in the decision.

"I do think it's a mistake to move it it's in our genes, it's in our blood- I like to think that possession is 9/10ths of the law," Eberhart said, "I do think it's important that we try to re-compete this."

With all of the conversations surrounding the move, Eberhart says he doesn't think disparaging other locations is the answer.

"The amount of time and energy and money that will be spent that could otherwise be spent obviously just continuing on the vector and the trajectory we're on now- it would be better spent. Why go build another building?," Eberhart said.