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KOAA Survey: How should Colorado schools handle Critical Race Theory?

KOAA Survey: How should Colorado schools handle Critical Race Theory?
Posted at 9:58 AM, Aug 13, 2021

On Thursday night, the Falcon School District 49 passed a resolution to ban Critical Race Theory on a 3-2 vote.

In response to this decision, News5 wants to know how you think Colorado Schools should handle Critical Race Theory.

RESULTS:
69% BAN IT
11% ONLY TAUGHT BY QUALIFIED TEACHERS
10% SHOULD BE MANDATORY
9% MAKE IT OPTIONAL

We're following this survey throughout the day and into tomorrow. Tune in to News5 at 4 p.m. as we review the results!

Editor's note: This survey is not based on scientific, representative samples and is solely for KOAA purposes.

Critical Race Theory is currently not taught in Colorado schools. According to D49, this decision will not change current instruction in D49 classrooms.

The district first considered this resolution back in June. According to the resolution, the district will not follow several principles attached to Critical Race Theory which they say include:

  • Instructors and schools shall not assign individuals or groups of students to participate in class or complete assignments based on their racial identity
  • Schools shall not participate in racial bias or stereotyping
  • Race Essentialism: the assertion that race is the most important identity
  • Collectivism: the assumption that group identity is more important than individual identity
  • Accusatory characterization of individuals as oppressed or oppressors according to their race

Twenty-three states have taken action as they have either banned or proposed bans to teach the curriculum, which suggests racism and division are not just based on personal prejudices but are ingrained in some of our country’s institutions.
What is Critical Race Theory?

Critical race theory is a concept that started in the 1970s and examines how race has played a role in shaping public policy. When integration began, but equality still lagged, a Black civil rights activist and lawyer at the time, Derrick Bell, looked at what was happening and asked the question: is this coincidence, or is this structural?

The idea then became an academic discipline that was born out of critical legal studies in the 1980s.

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