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Data shows affordable housing crisis impacts more women

Feb. 3 is last day to submit feedback on $5 million '2021 Action Plan'
Posted at 6:38 AM, Mar 30, 2021
and last updated 2021-03-30 08:54:12-04

COLORADO SPRINGS — From job losses, to evictions and foreclosures, data shows women have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

This month during International Women's Build Week, the Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity partnered with Lowe's to raise awareness on this issue, by kicking off more than 300 Women Build projects supporting women-led households across the United States, Canada, and India.

The Pikes Peak Humane Society will build on average of eight houses this year. They also offer a repair program for badly damaged homes.

Dawn is one local PPHFH recipient, who's getting a new house built now. She's a local CNA and a single mom who cares for her adult son who has disabilities. Dawn says loosing her house has always been a fear, but now she has one less huge burden to worry about.

"The best part about it is if my son's condition deteriorates the house is being built with that in mind," Dawn explained

Sadly, her story is not unique. Every day millions of women face the challenge of a future without stable housing.

"it's no surprise to me, that women are affected. It is largely women that are in the hospitality business. Not only that but if you look at the businesses that are out there, they are mostly women businesses," she said.

According to the National Women's Law Center, 80 percent of jobs lost in the U.S. during the pandemic were held by women.

"If that one person is cut off from any kind of workforce or livelihood I don't know how you make ends meet," said Laura Williams-Parish, a Community Relations Manager for PPHFH.