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Migrant crisis in NYC is alarming as city reaches capacity

Mayor Eric Adams' administration has asked a judge to allow New York to suspend the city's right to shelter law.
Migrant crisis in NYC is alarming as city reaches capacity
Posted at 7:08 PM, Oct 05, 2023
and last updated 2023-10-05 21:10:05-04

Newly arrived migrant Fedly Clairvil from Haiti says he's still waiting for a work permit.

"My work permit is still in process. But here they help me with everything," said Clairvil. 

Clairvil and his 3-year-old son have stayed at the Roosevelt Hotel in Manhattan for four months now. It's one of New York City's migrant intake centers for those seeking asylum in the United States.

"They're providing food, making sure I have paperwork, everything. They help with everything," said Clairvil. 

The father and his son traveled through Mexico on their way to the U.S. His son only has him, as he says his wife died two years ago.

Meanwhile, Mayor Eric Adams' administration has asked a judge to allow New York to suspend the city's right to shelter law which mandates the city to provide shelter to anyone, including single adults. The mayor says the city's shelters are at capacity. Homeless advocates strongly oppose the move. 

An asylum seeking Venezuelan mother says she's scared she won't have a place to stay with her special needs child. 

They traveled through the dangerous Darien Gap between Colombia and Panama to get to New York.

"I say to those who are pursuing the American dream, it should not turn into a nightmare," said NYC Mayor Eric Adams. 

Meanwhile, in Mexico Mayor Adams is trying to discourage asylum seekers from coming to his city.

"Having to live in conditions of congregate shelters, of not having the environment that they deserve, the inability to work, it just makes it extremely challenging," said Adams. 

Adams says he wants to hear from migrants and hear why they choose to come to New York. The city has received more than 122,000 migrants over the past year and hundreds still arrive daily.

Relations with the White House have been strained as Adams repeatedly demands more federal funding to alleviate the crisis in the city. 

As for Clairvil, he hopes for a better future for his son. 

"We are still living and continuing on so he can have a dream too," said Clairvil. 

SEE MORE: Biden administration to resume deportations of Venezuelans


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