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What bump stocks are and how they work - KOAA.com | Continuous News | Colorado Springs and Pueblo

What bump stocks are and how they work

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The Las Vegas gunman possessed a little-known attachments for rifles called bump stocks on a dozen of his rifles found in his hotel room. The Las Vegas gunman possessed a little-known attachments for rifles called bump stocks on a dozen of his rifles found in his hotel room.

The Las Vegas gunman possessed little-known attachments for rifles called "bump stocks" on a dozen of his rifles found in his hotel room. 

The stocks essentially allow a semi-automatic rifle to shoot more quickly to effectively mimic a fully automatic weapon. The government approved the attachment in 2010, after it concluded it did not violate federal law.

The device replaces the existing gun's stock and pistol grip, which allows the gun to move back and forth during the recoil, which bumps the shooter's finger against the trigger.

Due to the fact it still requires the finger to pull the trigger in order to fire a shot, it did not fit the definition of a fully-automatic weapon, which are much tougher to be licensed to own.

Our sister station KRIS-TV ran an investigative story on bump stocks in 2015. During that story, the rifle outfitted with a bump stock could fire 30 rounds in 3.1 seconds, which would equate to roughly 600 shots in a minute.

The bump stocks do negatively affect a shooter's accuracy, but in the case of the shooter in Las Vegas, accuracy didn't matter when firing into a crowd of thousands of people.

On Wednesday, California Democrat Sen. Dianne Feinstein introduced a bill to outlaw bump stocks. She previously authored an assault weapons ban that was in effect for 10 years before expiring in 2004.

Feinstein said her own daughter had planned to attend the Route 91 musical festival in Las Vegas where the concertgoers were killed.

(Associated Press writers Sadie Gurman in Washington and Michael Balsamo in Las Vegas contributed to this report.)

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