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Talking to kids about tragic events

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Aimee Solis is a counselor in Colorado Springs, she says one of the best things to do with your kids is exercise to get their mind off of devastating events Aimee Solis is a counselor in Colorado Springs, she says one of the best things to do with your kids is exercise to get their mind off of devastating events
COLORADO SPRINGS -


With the largest mass shooting in U.S. history in Las Vegas this week- kids and teens will possibly see the graphic photos and videos of the tragic events. 

'When we see really violent images and scary things happening that threat system can get activated,' said Aimee Solis, a licensed professional counselor in Colorado Springs at Mindful Springs. 

Solis is a counselor and mother and acknowledges how difficult it can be to talk to kids about tragic events around the world. 

When it comes to talking about it with children, it's important to check in with yourself to understand how you're reacting to the tragedy and pass that along to your children.

'Share as a parent what it's like for you, share what your patterns are and how you're responding,' said Solis. 

Solis says people are often wired to feel a response when other people are suffering- no matter if they actually know the people impacted.

Solis also believes it's important for parents to address the emotions their children might be experiencing, 'encourage them to take better care of themselves and normalize that it's really normal and human to feel impacted by this.'

One suggestion Solis offered is to engage in physical activity- whether it's a walk around the neighborhood or just getting outside for some fresh air, it's helpful for kids to feel safe in their own environment. 

'Do something with your body that's really important if you just try to step away but your mind is still going it's not going to be as effective as you get up and get moving,' said Solis. 

Something many people may have noticed on social media Monday morning- several news organizations offering disclaimers to graphic content showing the frightening videos and photos. 

Solis believes it's a good thing for social media consumers 'it feels more responsible.'

Solis says it's important to have open communication with kids and teens.

 'It can be overload like for anybody not just kids for kids especially,' said Solis. 

Seeing photos and videos of the violence may not be easily avoidable, especially for teens but Solis says the best thing to do is to find healthy alternatives. 

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